Psychology Of Web Design

Psychology Of Web Design

Among the most important ingredients for successful Web designs are creativity, planning, coding and design skills. However, many people forget that various psychological factors also play an important role when making design decisions.


Psychology of Web Design gives you insights on how the human brain deals with different elements, colors, contrast, symmetry and balance. Combining the usability guidelines from Maslow's pyramid will surely help you design closer to your audience’s desires.


  • Persuasion Triggers In Web Design
  • Designing For A Hierarchy Of Needs
  • Designing For The Mind
  • 10 Useful Usability Findings And Guidelines
  • 30 Usability Issues To Be Aware Of
  • Designing For Start-Ups: How To Deliver The Message Across
  • Color Theory For Designers - Part 1
  • Color Theory For Designers - Part 2
  • Color Theory For Designers - Part 3

Technical Information

  • Formats: PDF, EPUB, Kindle (DRM-free)
  • Pages: 272
  • Language: English
  • Released: February 2012
  • Publisher: Smashing Media GmbH
  • ISBN:978-3-943075-24-3

Excerpt From Chapter 2

Persuasion Triggers In Web Design — by David Travis

How do you make decisions? If you’re like most people, you’ll probably answer that you pride yourself on weighing the pros and cons of a situation carefully and then make a decision based on logic. You know that other people have weak personalities and are easily swayed by their emotions, but this rarely happens to you.

You’ve just experienced the fundamental attribution error — the tendency to believe that other people’s behaviour is due to their personality (“Josh is late because he’s a disorganised person”) whereas our behaviour is due to external circumstances (“I’m late because the directions were useless”).

Excerpt From Chapter 7

Color Theory For Designers, Part 1: The Meaning Of Color — by Cameron Chapman

Color in design is very subjective. What evokes one reaction in one person may evoke a very different reaction in someone else. Sometimes this is due to personal preference, and other times due to cultural background. Color theory is a science in itself. Studying how colors affect different people, either individually or as a group, is something some people build their careers on. And there’s a lot to it. Something as simple as changing the exact hue or saturation of a color can evoke a completely different feeling. Cultural differences mean that something that’s happy and uplifting in one country can be depressing in another.

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